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Global updates on electromagnetic compatibility and wireless telecommunication regulations

by Tetsuya Hashimoto, section manager, UL Verification Services

 

There were a lot of changes in 2011. The most important thing to note is that in many countries, former guidelines have now become directives or regulations. The contents may not have changed but they now are legal requirements.

European Union

In order to align with the New Legislative Framework (NLF) and ensure better product safety, the European Commission announced on November 21, 2011 nine proposed EU directives covering a wide range of products such as electrical and electronic products, lifts, measuring instruments and civil explosives.1 As such, the draft Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Directive and Low Voltage Directive are now available. The draft EMC Directive incorporates references to economic operators in the EMC guidelines and CE Marking in Regulation 765/2008. There is no significant change to the EMC and Low Voltage Directives since the last revision. The Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) Directive was published more than 10 years ago and is now being revised. The review will look at consistency in the R&TTE Directive between what are stipulated and actual practices.

On December 13, 2011, the Short Range Device (SRD) Decision was updated as 2011/829/EU.2 This is the fourth update after 2008/432/EC, 2009/381/EC and 2010/368/EU.

The latest update covers:

• the inclusion of high frequency bands 122-123 GHz and 244-246 GHz for non-specific short range devices,
• amendment of regulatory requirements in low frequency band for inductive devices,
• increase of power level in 2.4 GHz for Radio-frequency identification (RFID), and 
• inclusion of 24 GHz for vehicular radar and 64 GHz for Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). 


The harmonized standards under the R&TTE Directive were revised on September 21, 2011 and those under the EMC Directive on September 30, 2011.3 Two harmonized standards have been updated and they are EN 55022:2010 and EN 55024:2010. Two standards – EN 61000-6-3/A1:2011 and EN 61000-6-4/A1:2011 – were added, requiring EMI measurement of above 1GHz. As for the R&TTE Directive, EN 301 893 V1.4.1 was removed given that it was wrongly added in the last revision.

The harmonized standards under Regulation (EC) No 765/2008, Decision No 768/2008/EC and Regulation (EC) No 1221/2009 have also been published.4 These harmonized standards, such as EN ISO 9001and EN ISO/IEC 17025, relate to activities in conformity to each directive. To closely adhere to the Regulation and Decision, a product should be tested in a laboratory managed based on ISO/IEC 17025. To maintain conformity, a manufacturer shall continue to ensure that product quality is appropriately controlled by ISO 9001.

European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) expressed its opinions on the application standards for wireless chargers. Despite that the requirements for frequencies of 30 MHz or less in the EMC Directive are missing, the following guidelines are all encompassing:

1. Only charging, no data communication => Comply with EMC Directive and EN 62311 (EN 62479);
2. Data communication on same frequency as charging => Comply with EMC and R&TTE Directives and EN 62311 (EN 62479);
3. Data communication on a different frequency from charging => Comply with EMC Directive for charging and R&TTE Directive for data communication and EN 62311 (EN 62479).

Related articles:

- North America
- Oceania/ Asia / Other

Footnote:

[ European Union ]

1http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/11/1385&type=HTML
2http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:329:0010:0018:EN:PDF
3http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2011:277:0001:0035:EN:PDF
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2011:288:0001:0019:EN:PDF
4http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2011:292:0002:0005:EN:PDF

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