North America
Europe
Denmark
France
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
Poland
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
Latin America
Asia Pacific
Argentina
Brazil
Mexico
Australia
China
Hong Kong
India
Japan
Korea
New Zealand
Singapore
Taiwan
今まで以上に規模を拡大して内容を充実させたULのグローバル調査。製造者と消費者の態度や優先順位にどのような差異が見られるかを、様々な製品関連の検討要因にわたって精査します。

詳細を見る >
ULは、4つの基本分野全体にわたる基本的な発見、試験方法、ソフトウェア、規格を通して、世界をより安全にしていくための重要な方法を示す強力な取り組みであるNew Scienceをお届けしていることを誇りとしています。

詳細を見る >

規格

弊社の厳格な要件に基づいて、毎年何千点もの製品やコンポーネントに対する試験が行われています。

ダッシュボード

これまで以上にスマートで効率的かつ高速になったULのダッシュボードツールは、進化し続けるマーケットニーズを満たしていく企業のお役に立ちます。

詳細を見る >

LIBRARY

MARKS HUB

SERVICES

STANDARDS

Share

Hexavalent Chromium

To help PWS better understand the presence of this contaminant in their systems, UL now offers analysis of hexavalent chromium by EPA Method 218.6 revision 3.3. UL has invested in new state-of-the-art instrumentation to achieve an MRL of 0.02 μg/L and also offers a low-level testing option for total chromium of 0.1 μg/L by EPA Method 200.8.  Using these two analytical methods, UL is helping utilities better understand the impact of total chromium on formation of hexavalent chromium in their water system.

What is hexavalent chromium?

Chromium exists in the environment in one of three valence states:

  • Metal form (chromium-0)
  • Trivalent (chromium-3)
  • Hexavalent chromium (chromium-6)

The metal form occurs naturally in rocks, plants and soils and the trivalent form occurs naturally in vegetables, fruits, meats, grains and yeast and is considered a nutritionally essential element. Hexavalent chromium enters the environment primarily through industrial processes including the production of steel and metal alloys, chrome plating, dyes and pigments as well as leather and wood preservation and is a suspected carcinogen.

Monitoring for hexavalent chromium

Total chromium was first regulated in drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) in 1992 when a maximum contaminant limit (MCL) of 100 μg/L was set to protect against allergic dermatitis.

As suggested by a study published by the Environmental Working Group in December of 2010, hexavalent chromium may be more widespread in drinking water than previously understood. In January of 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published new recommendations for enhanced monitoring of hexavalent chromium in drinking water. The agency is strongly encouraging all public water systems (PWS) to consider monitoring for this contaminant on a quarterly basis at the following locations:

  • Untreated water at the intake / well
  • Entry points to the distribution system
  • Representative locations within the distribution system

Additional resources regarding hexavalent chromium